Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapter 10
Chapter 11
Chapter 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14
Chapter 15
Chapter 16
Chapter 17
Chapter 18
Chapter 19
Chapter 20
Chapter 21
Chapter 22
Chapter 23
Chapter 24
Chapter 25
Chapter 26
Chapter 27

Return to Darcula

Chapter 1

caleche – the folding hood of a horse-drawn carriage

goiter – abnormally enlarged thyroid gland

beetling – jutting or overhanging

polyglot – a person who speaks more than one language

smatter – to talk foolishly; with little knowledge

impalpable – difficult to detect or grasp by the mind or analyze

sinewy – rugged and powerful

reticent – reluctant to draw attention to yourself

loll – hang loosely or laxly

brigand – an armed thief who is a member of a band (group)

alacrity – liveliness and eagerness

foliage – leaf-like architectural ornament

 

Chapter 2

dilapadate – bring into a condition of decay or partial ruin by neglect or misuse

patronymic – of or derived from a personal or family name

intonation – rise and fall of the voice pitch

physiognomy – the human face

casement – a window sash that is hinged

pallor – unnatural lack of color in the skin

malady – impairment of normal physiological function affecting part or all of an organism

myriad – a large indefinite number; too numerous to be counted

precipice – a very steep cliff

prodigious – far beyond what is unusual in magnitude or degree

 lofty – of high moral or intellectual value, elevated in nature or style

veritable – not counterfeit or copied

Chapter 3
Chapter 4

militate – have force or influence; bring about an effect or change

ribald – a ribald person; someone who uses vulgar and offensive language

acumen – a tapering point; shrewdness shown by keen insight

compunction – a feeling of deep regret (usually for some misdeed)

imperious – having or showing arrogant superiority to and disdain of those one views as unworthy

mere – being nothing more than specified; apart from anything else; without additions or modifications –  noun - a small pond of standing water

aquiline – curved down like an eagle’s beak

tangible –capable of being treated as fact; capable of being perceived; especially capable of being handled or touched or felt

berserker – one of the ancient Norse warriors legendary for working themselves into a frenzy before a battle and fighting with reckless savagery and insane fury

mullioned – of windows; divided by vertical bars or piers usually of stone

languorous – lacking spirit or liveliness

idolatrous – blindly or excessively devoted or adoring; feeling or showing love and affection

 

nethermost – farthest down

repletion – the state of being satisfactorily full and unable to take on more

satiate – fill to satisfaction

gipsy – a laborer who moves from place to place as demanded by employment

mattock – a kind of pick that is used for digging; has a flat blade set at right angles to the handle

nebulous – lacking definition or definite content

gambol – light-hearted recreational activity for diversion or amusement

obeisance – bending the head or body or knee as a sign of reverence or submission or shame or greeting.

portmanteau – a large traveling bag made of stiff leather

cudgel – a club that is used as a weapon

whence – from what place, source, or cause

stately – refined or imposing in manner or appearance; befitting a royal court

 

Return to Dracula

Chapter 5
Chapter 6

stenograph – write in shorthand

centripetal – tending to move toward a center

centrifugal – tending to move away from a center

sanguine – confidently optimistic and cheerful

assiduously – with care and persistence

fervour – feelings of great warmth and intensity

 ebb – a gradual decline in size or strength or power or number, outward
flow of the tide

exultation – a feeling of extreme joy

paramount – having superior power and influence

heresy – a belief or opinion that rejects the beliefs of a religion

quaint – strange in an interesting or pleasing way, attractively old-fashioned

rebuff – reject outright

 

zoophagous – carnivorous

hobble – the uneven manner of walking that results from an injured leg

addle – mix up or confuse

dither – act nervously; be undecided; be uncertain

disgorge – eject the contents of the stomach through the mouth

expostulate – reason with someone for the purpose of expressing disapproval

brusquely – in a blunt direct manner

obliterate – do away with completely, without leaving a trace

rudimentary – being or involving basic facts; in the earliest stages of development

acquiesce – to agree or express agreement

obliterated – reduced to nothingness

 quay – a platform built out from the shore into water; provided access to
ships and boats

Return to Dracula

Chapter 7
Chapter 8
   
Chapter 9
Chapter 10
   
Chapter 11
Chapter 12
   
Chapte 13
Chapter 14
   
Chapter 15
Chapter 16
   
Chapter 17
Chapter 18
   
Chapter 19
Chapter 20
   
Chapter 21
Chapter 22
   
Chapter 23
Chapter 24
   
Chapter 25
Chapter 26
   
Chapter 27